Untentional Injury Death Rates in the U.S. Webinar

Webinar: Thursday, August 29, 2019 / 10:00am Pacific, 11:00am Mountain, 12:00pm Central, 1:00pm Eastern (Duration: approximately 60 minutes)

Speakers from the National Center for Health Statistics will discuss two recently published reports: Unintentional Injury Death Rates in Rural and Urban Areas: United States, 1999–2017 and Urban–Rural Differences in Drug Overdose Death Rates, by Sex, Age, and Type of Drugs Involved, 2017. Both reports are based on mortality data from the National Vital Statistics System.

The first report focuses on the most common causes of unintentional injury deaths. The presentation will cover historical trends and patterns by urbanization for unintentional injury deaths overall, with a more detailed look at motor vehicle traffic injuries, drug overdose, and falls.

The second report focuses on urban-rural differences in drug overdose death rates. The presentation will cover historical trends as well as differences by sex, age group and the types of drugs involved.

To join webinar: https://www.ruralhealthinfo.org/webinars/unintentional-injury-death-rates?utm_source=racupdate&utm_medium=email&utm_campaign=update082819

U.S. Department of Labor Announces $2.5 Million To Support Women Affected by Opioid Crisis

U.S. Department of Labor Announces $2.5 Million To Support Women Affected by Opioid Crisis (Deadline August 23, 2019) The U.S. Department of Labor announced a new grant program to help women affected by the opioid crisis re-enter the workforce. The Re-Employment, Support, and Training for the Opioid Related Epidemic (RESTORE) grant will award $2.5 million to organizations that assist in providing coordinated, employment-focused services to women. The RESTORE program will provide approximately four to eight grants to governments of states and outlying areas.

Details and to apply

The AmerisourceBergen Foundation Opioid Resource Grant Program

The AmerisourceBergen Foundation Opioid Resource Grant Program (Deadline August 15, 2019) provides funding for innovative and constructive projects that address education, prevention, and/or the safe disposal of opioids. Priority will be given to community projects that address the key areas of focus: Safe disposal management programs; Prevention education; Pilot programs for new ideas related to pre- and post-treatment activities.

AmerisourceBergen

Anthem Foundation Program Grants (Deadline August 9, 2019) support ongoing community health programs with proven and measurable outcomes

The Anthem Foundation funds specific public health-related initiatives that address the social determinants of health and positively affect conditions identified through our signature Healthy Generations program.

There are two funding options. Before applying, please review the descriptions for both and determine which best aligns with your request.
Funding opportunities

NIH establishes network to improve opioid addiction treatment in criminal justice settings

NIH establishes network to improve opioid addiction treatment in criminal justice settings: The National Institutes of Health will award 12 grants to form the Justice Community Opioid Innovation Network (JCOIN) to support research on quality addiction treatment for opioid use disorder (OUD) in criminal justice settings nationwide. The awards, totaling an estimated $155 million from the National Institute on Drug Abuse, part of NIH, will support the multi-year innovation network, including 10 research institutions and two centers that will provide supportive infrastructure.

NIH

Denial of Methadone Devastates Incarcerated People: What Hope?

When people who are dependent on opioids are incarcerated and denied access, they go into withdrawal—an often-painful condition with symptoms that include vomiting and diarrhea. Some incarcerated people have even died from this enforced “cold turkey.”

Yet the huge majority of such people in US prisons and jails do not receive the medications that could spare them this experience—and even more importantly, greatly improve their chances of survival after release.

Denial of Methadone Devastates Incarcerated People: What Hope?

Denial of Methadone Devastates Incarcerated People: What Hope?

BY ALISON KNOPF / JUNE 4, 2019
When people who are dependent on opioids are incarcerated and denied access, they go into withdrawal—an often-painful condition with symptoms that include vomiting and diarrhea. Some incarcerated people have even died from this enforced “cold turkey.”

Yet the huge majority of such people in US prisons and jails do not receive the medications that could spare them this experience—and even more importantly, greatly improve their chances of survival after release.

Full article at:

Denial of Methadone Devastates Incarcerated People: What Hope?